segunda-feira, 29 de maio de 2017

There Will Come Soft Rain - Sara Teasdale

       











There Will Come Soft Rain - Sara Teasdale

(War Time)

There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground,
And swallows circling with their shimmering sound;

And frogs in the pools singing at night,
And wild plum trees in tremulous white,

Robins will wear their feathery fire
Whistling their whims on a low fence-wire;

And not one will know of the war, not one
Will care at last when it is done.

Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree
If mankind perished utterly;

And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn,
Would scarcely know that we were gone.






Tongues of Toil William Francis Barnard
Vitai Lampada Sir Henry Newbolt
Winter Stars Sara Teasdale






The Sugar-Plum Tree - Eugene Field

Have you ever heard of the Sugar-Plum Tree?
‘Tis a marvel of great renown!
It blooms on the shore of the Lollypop sea
In the garden of Shut-Eye Town;
The fruit that it bears is so wondrously sweet
(As those who have tasted it say)
That good little children have only to eat
Of that fruit to be happy next day.

When you’ve got to the tree, you would have a hard time
To capture the fruit which I sing;
The tree is so tall that no person could climb
To the boughs where the sugar-plums swing!
But up in that tree sits a chocolate cat,
And a gingerbread dog prowls below -
And this is the way you contrive to get at
Those sugar-plums tempting you so:

You say but the word to that gingerbread dog
And he barks with such terrible zest
That the chocolate cat is at once all agog,
As her swelling proportions attest.
And the chocolate cat goes cavorting around
From this leafy limb unto that,
And the sugar-plums tumble, of course, to the ground -
Hurrah for that chocolate cat!

There are marshmallows, gumdrops, and peppermint canes,
With stripings of scarlet or gold,
And you carry away of the treasure that rains,
As much as your apron can hold!
So come, little child, cuddle closer to me
In your dainty white nightcap and gown,
And I’ll rock you away to that Sugar-Plum Tree
In the garden of Shut-Eye Town.




Stay, O Sweet - John Donne

STAY, O sweet, and do not rise!
    The light that shines comes from thine eyes;
  The day breaks not: it is my heart,
Because that you and I must part.
    Stay! or else my joys will die,      
  And perish in their infancy.

  ’Tis true, ’tis day: what though it be?
O, wilt thou therefore rise from me?
  Why should we rise because ’tis light?
Did we lie down because ’twas night?        10
  Love, which in spite of darkness brought us hither,
  Should in despite of light keep us together.

  Light hath no tongue, but is all eye.
If it could speak as well as spy,
  This were the worst that it could say:—        15
That, being well, I fain would stay,
  And that I lov’d my heart and honour so,
  That I would not from him, that had them, go.

  Must business thee from hence remove?
Oh, that’s the worse disease of love!        20
  The poor, the fool, the false, love can
Admit, but not the busied man.
  He, which hath business, and makes love, doth do
  Such wrong, as when a married man doth woo.







Sonnet - Rupert Brooke

"I said I splendidly loved you; it's not true"

I said I splendidly loved you; it's not true.
   Such long swift tides stir not a land-locked sea.
On gods or fools the high risk falls -- on you --
   The clean clear bitter-sweet that's not for me.
Love soars from earth to ecstasies unwist.
   Love is flung Lucifer-like from Heaven to Hell.
But -- there are wanderers in the middle mist,
   Who cry for shadows, clutch, and cannot tell
Whether they love at all, or, loving, whom:
   An old song's lady, a fool in fancy dress,
Or phantoms, or their own face on the gloom;
   For love of Love, or from heart's loneliness.
Pleasure's not theirs, nor pain. They doubt, and sigh,
   And do not love at all. Of these am I.





Oh! Death will find me, long before I tire
   Of watching you; and swing me suddenly
Into the shade and loneliness and mire
   Of the last land! There, waiting patiently,

One day, I think, I'll feel a cool wind blowing,
   See a slow light across the Stygian tide,
And hear the Dead about me stir, unknowing,
   And tremble. And I shall know that you have died.

And watch you, a broad-browed and smiling dream,
   Pass, light as ever, through the lightless host,
Quietly ponder, start, and sway, and gleam---
   Most individual and bewildering ghost!---

And turn, and toss your brown delightful head
Amusedly, among the ancient Dead.


War Sonnets IV - The Dead - Rupert Brooke

These hearts were woven of human joys and cares,
   Washed marvellously with sorrow, swift to mirth.
The years had given them kindness. Dawn was theirs,
   And sunset, and the colours of the earth.
These had seen movement, and heard music; known
   Slumber and waking; loved; gone proudly friended;
Felt the quick stir of wonder; sat alone;
   Touched flowers and furs and cheeks. All this is ended.
There are waters blown by changing winds to laughter
And lit by the rich skies, all day. And after,
   Frost, with a gesture, stays the waves that dance
And wandering loveliness. He leaves a white
Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance,
   A width, a shining peace, under the night.






So Oft As I Her Beauty Do Behold - Edmund Spenser

So oft as I her beauty do behold,
And therewith do her cruelty compare,
I marvel of what substance was the mould
The which her made at once so cruel-fair.
Not earth; for her high thoughts more heavenly are:
Not water; for her love doth burn like fire:
Not air; for she is not so light or rare:
Not fire; for she doth freeze with faint desire.

Then needs another element inquire
Whereof she might be made; that is, the sky.
For to the heaven her haughty looks aspire,
And eke her love is pure immortal high.
Then since to heaven ye likened are the best,
Be like in mercy as in all the rest.







The Microbe - Hilaire Belloc

THE MICROBE is so very small
You cannot make him out at all,
But many sanguine people hope
To see him through a microscope.
His jointed tongue that lies beneath
A hundred curious rows of teeth;
His seven tufted tails with lots
Of lovely pink and purple spots,
On each of which a pattern stands,
Composed of forty separate bands;
His eyebrows of a tender green;
All these have never yet been seen--
But Scientists, who ought to know,
Assure us that is must be so...
Oh! let us never, never doubt
What nobody is sure about!







Out, Out Robert Frost
Selections from Rig Veda Americanus Daniel Garrison Brinton
The Rose-Bud William Broome






Let It Be Forgotten - Sara Teasdale

Let it be forgotten, as a flower is forgotten,
Forgotten as a fire that once was singing gold,
Let it be forgotten for ever and ever,
Time is a kind friend, he will make us old.

If anyone asks, say it was forgotten
Long and long ago,
As a flower, as a fire, as a hushed footfall
In a long forgotten snow.






The Legatee - Ambrose Bierce

In fair San Francisco a good man did dwell,
And he wrote out a will, for he didn't feel well.
Said he: 'It is proper, when making a gift,
To stimulate virtue by comforting thrift.'

So he left all his property, legal and straight,
To 'the cursedest rascal in all of the State.'
But the name he refused to insert, for, said he:
'Let each man consider himself legatee.'

In due course of time that philanthropist died,
And all San Francisco, and Oakland beside-
Save only the lawyers-came each with his claim,
The lawyers preferring to manage the same.

The cases were tried in Department Thirteen,
Judge Murphy presided, sedate and serene,
But couldn't quite specify, legal and straight,
The cursedest rascal in all of the State.

And so he remarked to them, little and big-
To claimants: 'You skip!' and to lawyers: 'You dig!'
They tumbled, tumultuous, out of his court
And left him victorious, holding the fort.

'Twas then that he said: 'It is plain to my mind
This property's ownerless-how can I find
The cursedest rascal in all of the State?'
So he took it himself, which was legal and straight.






The Latest Decalogue - Arthur Hugh Clough

Thou shalt have one God only; who
    Would tax himself to worship two?
    God's image nowhere shalt thou see,
    Save haply in the currency:
    Swear not at all; since for thy curse
    Thine enemy is not the worse:
    At church on Sunday to attend
    Will help to keep the world thy friend:
    Honor thy parents; that is, all
    From whom promotion may befall:
    Thou shalt not kill; but needst not strive
    Officiously to keep alive:
    Adultery it is not fit
    Or safe, for women, to commit:
    Thou shalt not steal; an empty feat,
    When 'tis so lucrative to cheat:
    False witness not to bear be strict;
    And cautious, ere you contradict.
    Thou shalt not covet; but tradition
    Sanctions the keenest competition.








The Daffodils - William Wordsworth

I wandered lonely as a cloud
   That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
   A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
   And twinkle on the Milky Way,
They stretched in never-ending line
   Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced, but they
   Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A Poet could not but be gay,
   In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
   In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
   Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.







The Flowers' Ball Benjamin King
The Gods of the Copybook Headings Rudyard Kipling








Caedmon's Hymn - Caedmon

Now let me praise the keeper of Heaven's kingdom,
The might of the Creator, and his thought,
The work of the Father of glory, how each of wonders
The Eternal Lord established in the beginning.
He first created for the sons of men
Heaven as a roof, the holy Creator,
Then Middle-earth the keeper of mankind,
The Eternal Lord, afterwards made,
The earth for men, the Almighty Lord.

Nu scylun hergan hefaenricaes uard
metudæs maecti end his modgidanc
uerc uuldurfadur sue he uundra gihuaes
eci dryctin or astelidæ
he aerist scop aelda barnum
heben til hrofe haleg scepen.
tha middungeard moncynnæs uard
eci dryctin æfter tiadæ
firum foldu frea allmectigprimo cantauit Cædmon istud carmen.


Nu scilun herga hefenricæs uard
metudæs mehti and his modgithanc
uerc uuldurfadur sue he uundra gihuæs
eci dryctin or astelidæ.
he ærist scop ældu barnum
hefen to hrofæ halig sceppend
tha middingard moncynn&ealig; s uard
eci dryctin æfter tiadæ
firum foldu frea allmehtig






The Children's Hour Henry Wadsworth Longfellow





Short Poetry Collection 007



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